SparkNotes’ Summary Video

Hello guys! Today I give you the best summary video on Mary Shelley’s novel that I have been able to find on the Internet.

The SparkNotes team has done an impressing work producing this summary video. The video covers the important parts of the novel while offering a quick synopsis, analysis, and discussions about the major themes and characters of the novel.

I hope you guys enjoy the video and may it help you understand the novel even more!

Credit: SparkNotes, channel: VideoSparkNotes

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Universal May Have Found a Director for its Remake of The Bride of Frankenstein

With the arrival of The Mummy with Tom Cruise on June 9, Universal Studio has the plan of releasing several remakes of famous monster movies. Thus, the well-known studio has an idea of remaking The Bride of Frankenstein written by John Whale in the next year, which was initially released in 1935. Universal Studio has started to contact potential directors to make this project happen. Thus, it has approached an outstanding Director who is well-known in the horror industry to remake this classic potentially. His name is Bill Condon who has recently remake the Beauty and the Beast for Disney, which has recently raised an immense sum of $ 1 billion at the box office. Furthermore, Mr. Condom has also directed critically acclaimed horror movies like twilight or a movie called Gods and Monsters released in 1998 that features reconstructions of wale’s movie, which will make him the perfect fit for this remake.

With an incredible average rating of 9.1, The Bride of Frankenstein is without a doubt a classic that reaches several generations and as grown in notoriety in the last century. It is even in the top 100 of the best movies of all time by the magazine Time. Thus, this remake could satisfy not only the old-school fans of horror movies but could lead to important commercial performances for Universal Studio with Mr. Condon at its side who could attract major stars to play roles with his prestigious notoriety. However, it is early talks, and both parties have many negotiations to do before they arrive at a final agreement. Even though these negotiations could take some time, we can still stay optimist that the realization of the remake should start at the end of the year with the two parties that claim to be excited to have a potential collaboration with each other.

Credits: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2345759/

https://www.forbes.com/sites/scottmendelson/2017/04/14/bill-condon-may-helm-bride-of-frankenstein-as-universals-monster-universe-gets-crowded/#700fc94f7843

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gods_and_Monsters_(film)

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/bill-condon-early-talks-direct-bride-frankenstein-remake-994130

Epic Quotes from Frankenstein, What Could they Mean??

No human being could have passed a happier childhood than myself. My parents were possessed by the very spirit of kindness and indulgence. We felt that they were not the tyrants to rule our lot according to their caprice, but the agents and creators of all the many delights which we enjoyed. When I mingled with other families, I distinctly discerned how peculiarly fortunate my lot was, and gratitude assisted the development of filial love.”

-Frankenstein, Chapter 2

Could there be a different meaning behind Frankenstein’s childhood? One that contrasts directly with his creation? Victor’s childhood life was distinguished by his parents who cared and loved for him. In a sense, the monster’s “childhood” if we may, antitheses with his own.


One man’s life or death were but a small price to pay for the acquirement of the knowledge which I sought, for the dominion I should acquire and transmit over the elemental foes of our race.”

-Walton, Letter 4

Here Robert is writing to his sister about how important his goals are. Could he possibly be saying that it’s ok of if a man dies in the name of science as long as he fulfills his principles of scientific achievements? Walton is starting to go some-what mad. Is there possibly a foreshadowing effect?

 


When night came again I found, with pleasure, that the fire gave light as well as heat and that the discovery of this element was useful to me in my food, for I found some of the offals that the travellers had left had been roasted, and tasted much more savoury than the berries I gathered from the trees. I tried, therefore, to dress my food in the same manner, placing it on the live embers. I found that the berries were spoiled by this operation, and the nuts and roots much improved.”

Just like his creator, is he attempting to comprehend the existence of acquiring scientific results by repeated, varied attempts which are continued until success?

-The Monster, Chapter 11


Cursed, cursed creator! Why did I live? Why, in that instant, did I not extinguish the spark of existence which you had so wantonly bestowed? I know not; despair had not yet taken possession of me; my feelings were those of rage and revenge. I could with pleasure have destroyed the cottage and its inhabitants and have glutted myself with their shrieks and misery.”

The Monster, Chapter 16

The phrase “The spark of existence which you had so wantonly bestowed” ressembles a lot like a disapproval of people having babies, mainly taking into account that the word “wanton” is used when defining excessive sexual activity, which in the past meant that the family tended to have an”immoderate” amount babies.

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How Norse Mythology Influenced the Frankenstein Novel

While writing Frankenstein, Shelley drew inspiration (intentionally or not) from the vast repertoire of Norse Mythology. There are many parallels between the characters found within the novel, notably Frankenstein and his Monster. It could be argued that Frankenstein’s Monster is an adaptation of Loki, the Norse Jötunn god of Mischief, and Frankenstein is an adaptation of Thor, the Norse god of Thunder. Through extensive analysis, it is apparent that the climax of the story is very similar to the events leading to the Ragnarok, the Norse Apocalypse, all the way down to symbolic representations.

Firstly, it is important to understand the general context of the Ragnarok. In this case, a specific part of it is observed: when Thor ventures into Niflheim, an icebound wasteland, home to all the evil creatures conspiring towards the end of the world. Symbolically, Frankenstein resembles Thor as he is associated with lightning, adventurousness (through scientific exploits and breaking boundaries). The Monster, represents Loki, as he is quite similar to a Jötunn (Ice Giants) in terms of physique. His actions also resemble Loki as they are meant to cause chaos and lead to the demise of the Hero (Frankenstein).

Upon reaching the arctic wasteland in pursuit of the Monster, Frankenstein’s means of transportation (Sled-Dogs) fails him. This could be interpreted as a representation of Fenrir, Loki’s wolf son, being the first obstacle in his quest. Frankenstein then finds shelter on an expedition ship, thus conquering the sea, which could be interpreted as Jörmungandr (the Sea-Serpent). Unfortunately, as Jörmungandr’s poison kills Thor after the battle, the frostbite and illness claim Frankenstein.

The Monster, now in his solitude, is punished for his crimes in a similar fashion as Loki. The Norse Trickster God was bound by chains for eternity, where poison is dripped onto his head. His wife is there to collect the poison in a bowl before it damages Loki, but when she leaves to empty said bowl, Loki is left to writhe in pain as the poison drips onto him. Similarly, the Monster is left to writhe in agony as the absence of his wife renders him unable to mitigate the emotional pain caused by eternal loneliness.
Sources:

https://ojs.unbc.ca/index.php/joe/article/download/234/307

http://norse-mythology.org/gods-and-creatures/the-aesir-gods-and-goddesses/loki/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fenrir

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C3%B6rmungandr

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loki

Frankenstein’s Monster: An Archetypal Lover

To understand the content of this post, one must first understand the context and basic concepts of Jungian Archetypal Psychology. Carl Jung was a famous psychologist who believed that the human psyche follows archetypal patterns, and that personality could be predicted according to said archetypes. While the number of archetypes increases as we delve deeper into more specific psychological characteristics, for the sake of simplicity, this analysis will focus on the 12 major archetypes.

These 12 archetypes are divided into three sets of 4; The Ego, the Soul, and the Self. This gives a general understanding of where the interests of each archetype lie. It is important to note that one person may have an amalgam of different archetypal characteristics, however there is always one dominant one. It is also important to understand that the given archetype of a person may change after a life-changing event has occurred, as is the case for Frankenstein’s Monster.

From what is described in the beginning of the novel, where the Monster is introduced and has a chance to re-tell its experiences, readers can clearly see that, initially, it is not evil. Given the desires that drive the Monster, it is clear that he belongs to the Lover archetype. The Lover aims a sense of intimacy and belonging with others, and does so through passion, admiration, and selflessness. This is clearly visible when the Monster assists the family of peasants in their daily struggles. Completely altruistic in being, the creature merely wishes to be of assistance. However, the Monster’s personality directly clashes with his physical appearance. Though he has perfect white teeth and flowing black hair, his eyes remain pale and dead, which is a permanent barrier to his sense of inclusion.

After facing colossal rejection from the object of his admiration, the Monster’s personality consumes itself in chaos. His passion degenerates to rage, self-loathing, and vengeance. All the positive aspects of the Lover are warped into their negative counterparts. This follows the typical symbolism of the “Son eating the Father”, as is represented in Oedipus, as well as numerous myths throughout history. This leads to both the demise of the Father (Frankenstein) as well as Son (the Monster). The creature becomes essentially the antithesis of his own being.

Sources:

http://www.soulcraft.co/essays/the_12_common_archetypes.html

Milton’s Paradise Lost

 

As said in one of our previous posts, Milton’s Paradise Lost plays as a religious figure in Frankenstein, but there is way more to it.

As soon as Victor Frankenstein made his monster, he left. That made the monster unable to live in society (unable to read, talk, or even understand thirst and hunger). Over time, the monster learns to read English. He finds a book called Paradise Lost and reads it.

Paradise Lost is indeed a book that gives a religious aspect to the book, as it talks about Adam and Eve in a more extended way. It is interesting to consider that the monster reads it. This is a pretty complicated book to read. Most of us humans would have difficulties reading it, but the monster reads it anyway. Paradise Lost is a very thick novel.

The book Paradise Lost was written in 1667, and Frankenstein in 1818, which represents a difference of over one and a half century.

There is an ironic part as Paradise Lost talks about how the first humans came to life in such a random way, just like Frankenstein’s monster.

 

Religion in Frankenstein

While many understand Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” as a novel of dismay, there is obviously a religious presence in the background due to the attachment of John Milton’s “Paradise Lost” written in 1667. Milton merged Paganism, classical Greek mentions, and Christianity into the poem.

Moving on, the counter religious manner of Shelley seems to be present. It appears that Shelley is not merely disregarding religion and leaving it out, but instead reasoning against it. While distinctive characters in the story can be associated to biblical symbols, Frankenstein takes place in a world that is absent of religion. Despite this after the story, Frankenstein dies a morally sound man.