Foolish Mortals Beware… It’s the House of Frankenstein

Foolish mortals beware…

The summer is coming up and you may be looking for trips and activities to spend the lovely hot days of the summer season.

If you are fans of haunted houses and horror attractions, I suggest you visit the House of Frankenstein in Toronto. Yes, going to Toronto for a haunted house may sound crazy but it is worth the trip as you can also visit different attractions and haunted houses on the same street as the House of Frankenstein.

Your love for Frankenstein will be duplicated as you will encounter the famous creation as well as many “monsters” inside of this terrifying house. Be prepared to face and see the abominations that will make you scream!

Be warned guys… this is not for the weak of heart!

Click here to have more information about the House of Frankenstein.

Are you considering visiting this house this summer? Let us know in the comments!

Picture’s credit: House of Frankenstein, http://www.houseofrankenstein.ca

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The creature IS Bigfoot!

There is a mythical creature that is said to live in the Americas called Bigfoot and also known as Sasquatch. This is the same creature as the one made by Victor Frankenstein because the creature told Victor his plan for when he would be done with him.

“I will go to the vast wilds of South America. My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment.” He said this on page 176 of the novel. At the end of the story, the creature says it will make a pyre and burn itself to death but we have no way of knowing if the creature really does this as he “was soon borne away by the waves and lost in darkness and distance.” Since the creature struggles to stay alive for the whole story, we have no reason to think it will actually kill itself but instead it most probably went south to the New World (the Americas). As for it surviving all these years, the answer is simple: the creature can’t die from old age because it is already dead.

Bigfoot is said to be around 8 feet tall, have a pronounced brow ridge, have black hair and a strong unpleasant smell. It is also said that Bigfoot is omnivorous and nocturnal. All of these things are true for Frankenstein’s creature as well. This is why Frankenstein’s creature is still alive and is no other than the mythical Bigfoot.

SparkNotes’ Summary Video

Hello guys! Today I give you the best summary video on Mary Shelley’s novel that I have been able to find on the Internet.

The SparkNotes team has done an impressing work producing this summary video. The video covers the important parts of the novel while offering a quick synopsis, analysis, and discussions about the major themes and characters of the novel.

I hope you guys enjoy the video and may it help you understand the novel even more!

Credit: SparkNotes, channel: VideoSparkNotes

Frankenstein in Real Life

In 1940, Russians scientifics made an experiment where they kept a dog`s head alive for few minutes. The head of the dog reacted to sound, touch, taste and light.

Even if it is disgusting for the average citizen, it is quite incredible from a scientific point of view.

For a long time, we thought of bringing the dead back to life as imaginary, fantasy and science-fiction, such as Frankenstein’s monster.

Even if it lasted only for a few minutes, it is incredible results, considering that it has been performed in 1940.

Science never stops evolving, as the first human head transplantation is scheduled for December 2017.

It is interesting to consider how Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is seen has one of the greatest horror stories of all time, and how its main plot might become reality in years to come.

Credit to jonesdavy72 for the Youtube video

Epic Quotes from Frankenstein, What Could they Mean??

No human being could have passed a happier childhood than myself. My parents were possessed by the very spirit of kindness and indulgence. We felt that they were not the tyrants to rule our lot according to their caprice, but the agents and creators of all the many delights which we enjoyed. When I mingled with other families, I distinctly discerned how peculiarly fortunate my lot was, and gratitude assisted the development of filial love.”

-Frankenstein, Chapter 2

Could there be a different meaning behind Frankenstein’s childhood? One that contrasts directly with his creation? Victor’s childhood life was distinguished by his parents who cared and loved for him. In a sense, the monster’s “childhood” if we may, antitheses with his own.


One man’s life or death were but a small price to pay for the acquirement of the knowledge which I sought, for the dominion I should acquire and transmit over the elemental foes of our race.”

-Walton, Letter 4

Here Robert is writing to his sister about how important his goals are. Could he possibly be saying that it’s ok of if a man dies in the name of science as long as he fulfills his principles of scientific achievements? Walton is starting to go some-what mad. Is there possibly a foreshadowing effect?

 


When night came again I found, with pleasure, that the fire gave light as well as heat and that the discovery of this element was useful to me in my food, for I found some of the offals that the travellers had left had been roasted, and tasted much more savoury than the berries I gathered from the trees. I tried, therefore, to dress my food in the same manner, placing it on the live embers. I found that the berries were spoiled by this operation, and the nuts and roots much improved.”

Just like his creator, is he attempting to comprehend the existence of acquiring scientific results by repeated, varied attempts which are continued until success?

-The Monster, Chapter 11


Cursed, cursed creator! Why did I live? Why, in that instant, did I not extinguish the spark of existence which you had so wantonly bestowed? I know not; despair had not yet taken possession of me; my feelings were those of rage and revenge. I could with pleasure have destroyed the cottage and its inhabitants and have glutted myself with their shrieks and misery.”

The Monster, Chapter 16

The phrase “The spark of existence which you had so wantonly bestowed” ressembles a lot like a disapproval of people having babies, mainly taking into account that the word “wanton” is used when defining excessive sexual activity, which in the past meant that the family tended to have an”immoderate” amount babies.

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Frankenstein’s Video Games?

As we all passionately know, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is an important novel in American literature. It has influenced many authors, singers, and artists and it is still an influence on our popular culture today. Many movies have been made from it with a count of approximately 50 films.

Not only movies have been made from the novel, but there are video games too. Yes, you read it right, there is some video games based on Frankenstein.

Here is a list of five of those video games:

Dr. Franken: The Adventures of Dr. Franken

Dr. Franken is a single-player video game originally launched on the Game Boy in 1992. It was also released in 1993 on the Super NES. It was developed by Elite Systems and published by Kemco and DTMC.

The game is about Franky, a Frankenstein’s monster that is on a quest to collect the sprinkled body parts of her girlfriend. The game also consists of seven floors where Franky could find various items and parts of her lovely girlfriend. To resurrect his girlfriend Bitsy, keys and special items are necessary to access new areas and to find all the missing parts of Bitsy.

A sequel to the original game was released on the Game Boy in 1997 and was called Dr. Franken II. In this game, Franky must escape the castle in which he finds himself trapped to search for pieces and gold tablet.

Frankenstein by CRL

Frankenstein by CRL is an interactive fiction game released in 1987 by CRL for the Commodore 64, the Amstrad CPC, and the ZX Spectrum computers.

In this game, the player incarnates Dr. Frankenstein who must find and destroy his unleashed monster. On the other hand, the monster must remain free and learn and understand the reason of its creation.

This game was declared an intelligent, gigantic text adventure with a few magnificent illustrations by Sinclair User.

Frankenstein: The Monster Returns

Frankenstein: The Monster Returns is a single-player Nintendo video game published in 1990 by Bandai. The game was released exclusively in North America.

The game takes place after the Frankenstein story. The creature returns from the dead and lead, by the way of magic, a supernatural army. With its magic, the monster has been able to control mythical entities such as Death and Medusa. In this game, the player incarnates a swordsman that is determined to stop the unleashed monster and its army to rescue Emily, a beautiful maiden that was kidnaped by the monster, a slay the unstoppable thing for good.

Frankenstein: Through the Eyes of the Monster

Frankenstein: Through the Eyes of the Monster is an adventure game that stars Tim Curry as Dr. Frankenstein. The game was developed my Amazing Media and Tachyon Studios and was published by Interplay on PC, Mac, and Sega Saturn in a span of three years between 1995 and 1997.

The player is controlling a newly created monster and tries to resurrect Gabrielle, a disappeared child that was killed in an explosion caused by Dr. Frankenstein. The monster that the player incarnates is the late Philip Werren that is brought back to life by Victor Frankenstein and Gabrielle is Werren’s daughter. There are two possible endings to the game, which give different choices to the player that will branch the game into one ending or the other.

The game received an average of about two stars.

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is a single-player video games that was launched in 1994 for multiple platforms such as the Super NES, the Sega CD, and the Sega Genesis. The game is based on the 1994 film of Frankenstein and was developed by Bits Studio and published by Sony Imagesoft.

In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein video game, the player controls Frankenstein’s monster as it walks through the streets of Ingolstadt, Bavaria. The game takes place in 1793. The player, controlling the creature, seeks revenge against its creator Victor for rejecting him.

The game received a 5.8 out of 10 score from Electronic Gaming Monthly. The magazine called the game a challenging game that includes awkward fighting actions.

 

Now that you know more about those Frankenstein video games, are you willing to try them out? Will you take the fight as the monster or play as the doctor to stop his own creation? Let us know in the comments!

Sources : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Video_games_based_on_Frankenstein

Who is at fault?

Who is more at fault: Victor Frankenstein or the Monster?

This is a question that the story leaves the reader with. On one side, we can say that Victor Frankenstein is irresponsible for what he did. Also, he had no real reason to create a monster, except out of scientific curiosity. Also, Victor is careless with his family, which they basically all die throughout the story.

On the other hand, we can say that the monster clearly overreacts throughout the story. Of course, some bad happen to him, but it is certainly not a reason to kill. The monster is therefore more at fault on this point.

How Norse Mythology Influenced the Frankenstein Novel

While writing Frankenstein, Shelley drew inspiration (intentionally or not) from the vast repertoire of Norse Mythology. There are many parallels between the characters found within the novel, notably Frankenstein and his Monster. It could be argued that Frankenstein’s Monster is an adaptation of Loki, the Norse Jötunn god of Mischief, and Frankenstein is an adaptation of Thor, the Norse god of Thunder. Through extensive analysis, it is apparent that the climax of the story is very similar to the events leading to the Ragnarok, the Norse Apocalypse, all the way down to symbolic representations.

Firstly, it is important to understand the general context of the Ragnarok. In this case, a specific part of it is observed: when Thor ventures into Niflheim, an icebound wasteland, home to all the evil creatures conspiring towards the end of the world. Symbolically, Frankenstein resembles Thor as he is associated with lightning, adventurousness (through scientific exploits and breaking boundaries). The Monster, represents Loki, as he is quite similar to a Jötunn (Ice Giants) in terms of physique. His actions also resemble Loki as they are meant to cause chaos and lead to the demise of the Hero (Frankenstein).

Upon reaching the arctic wasteland in pursuit of the Monster, Frankenstein’s means of transportation (Sled-Dogs) fails him. This could be interpreted as a representation of Fenrir, Loki’s wolf son, being the first obstacle in his quest. Frankenstein then finds shelter on an expedition ship, thus conquering the sea, which could be interpreted as Jörmungandr (the Sea-Serpent). Unfortunately, as Jörmungandr’s poison kills Thor after the battle, the frostbite and illness claim Frankenstein.

The Monster, now in his solitude, is punished for his crimes in a similar fashion as Loki. The Norse Trickster God was bound by chains for eternity, where poison is dripped onto his head. His wife is there to collect the poison in a bowl before it damages Loki, but when she leaves to empty said bowl, Loki is left to writhe in pain as the poison drips onto him. Similarly, the Monster is left to writhe in agony as the absence of his wife renders him unable to mitigate the emotional pain caused by eternal loneliness.
Sources:

https://ojs.unbc.ca/index.php/joe/article/download/234/307

http://norse-mythology.org/gods-and-creatures/the-aesir-gods-and-goddesses/loki/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fenrir

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C3%B6rmungandr

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loki

Frankenstein’s Monster: An Archetypal Lover

To understand the content of this post, one must first understand the context and basic concepts of Jungian Archetypal Psychology. Carl Jung was a famous psychologist who believed that the human psyche follows archetypal patterns, and that personality could be predicted according to said archetypes. While the number of archetypes increases as we delve deeper into more specific psychological characteristics, for the sake of simplicity, this analysis will focus on the 12 major archetypes.

These 12 archetypes are divided into three sets of 4; The Ego, the Soul, and the Self. This gives a general understanding of where the interests of each archetype lie. It is important to note that one person may have an amalgam of different archetypal characteristics, however there is always one dominant one. It is also important to understand that the given archetype of a person may change after a life-changing event has occurred, as is the case for Frankenstein’s Monster.

From what is described in the beginning of the novel, where the Monster is introduced and has a chance to re-tell its experiences, readers can clearly see that, initially, it is not evil. Given the desires that drive the Monster, it is clear that he belongs to the Lover archetype. The Lover aims a sense of intimacy and belonging with others, and does so through passion, admiration, and selflessness. This is clearly visible when the Monster assists the family of peasants in their daily struggles. Completely altruistic in being, the creature merely wishes to be of assistance. However, the Monster’s personality directly clashes with his physical appearance. Though he has perfect white teeth and flowing black hair, his eyes remain pale and dead, which is a permanent barrier to his sense of inclusion.

After facing colossal rejection from the object of his admiration, the Monster’s personality consumes itself in chaos. His passion degenerates to rage, self-loathing, and vengeance. All the positive aspects of the Lover are warped into their negative counterparts. This follows the typical symbolism of the “Son eating the Father”, as is represented in Oedipus, as well as numerous myths throughout history. This leads to both the demise of the Father (Frankenstein) as well as Son (the Monster). The creature becomes essentially the antithesis of his own being.

Sources:

http://www.soulcraft.co/essays/the_12_common_archetypes.html

Success and Failure in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Victor Frankenstein is a man who has been successful throughout his life. His plan to create a man was at first a crazy idea. Success and failure are both very present during his life. Victor’s creation of the monster was both a success and a failure. It was a success because he was able to create a being out of a lab. This being which he created was brilliant, he had dreamed about creating a man and had worked so hard to achieve this. Once Victor had created the monster he regretted it right away, saying, “the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart.” (Shelley 35) He created a monster who was so dreadful that he could not even look at it without disgust. He had failed to create a being who could adapt to the human world, the monster he had created was too strong, too ugly, too frightening to be accepted by any human. This is where failure took over the success of creating this being which he so longed for. He had created a being who did no good and who killed Victor’s family. In the end, his creation was only a failure to his life because his own hands were the creator of the killer of his family.