The Monster’s Creation: A Different Presentation

As we all know, the 1931 Frankenstein movie is an horror and Science Fiction classic. It is also being considered as one of the best movie of all time, genres for genres.

The creation of the monster and the “It’s alive! It’s alive!” line are pure classics that will still be instilled in pop culture for a long time. The line itself was ranked as the 49th greatest movie quote in american cinema history.


Here is a movie clip of the creation of the monster:

After looking at this scene, which presentation of the creation you prefer? Is the passage of the novel more powerful than this classic scene? Let us know in the comments!

Video credit: Movieclips.

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3 famous rock artists that made a song about Frankenstein

Throughout the last few decades, horror has often been an important part of the culture of rock, metal, and punk. Thus, several songs have been written referring about Frankenstein. In this case, here are 3 popular rock artists/groups that made a great song about this well-known monster.


SOME KIND OF MONSTER BY METALLICA


TEENAGE FRANKENSTEIN BY ALICE COOPER


MUTTER BY RAMMSTEIN


 Let me know what is your favorite song about Frankenstein!

Credit: http://teamrock.com/feature/2016-10-28/the-10-best-songs-about-frankenstein

Note: These videos are used for scholar purposes. I do not own any copyright of these songs.

SparkNotes’ Summary Video

Hello guys! Today I give you the best summary video on Mary Shelley’s novel that I have been able to find on the Internet.

The SparkNotes team has done an impressing work producing this summary video. The video covers the important parts of the novel while offering a quick synopsis, analysis, and discussions about the major themes and characters of the novel.

I hope you guys enjoy the video and may it help you understand the novel even more!

Credit: SparkNotes, channel: VideoSparkNotes

Frankenstein in Real Life

In 1940, Russians scientifics made an experiment where they kept a dog`s head alive for few minutes. The head of the dog reacted to sound, touch, taste and light.

Even if it is disgusting for the average citizen, it is quite incredible from a scientific point of view.

For a long time, we thought of bringing the dead back to life as imaginary, fantasy and science-fiction, such as Frankenstein’s monster.

Even if it lasted only for a few minutes, it is incredible results, considering that it has been performed in 1940.

Science never stops evolving, as the first human head transplantation is scheduled for December 2017.

It is interesting to consider how Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is seen has one of the greatest horror stories of all time, and how its main plot might become reality in years to come.

Credit to jonesdavy72 for the Youtube video

How Norse Mythology Influenced the Frankenstein Novel

While writing Frankenstein, Shelley drew inspiration (intentionally or not) from the vast repertoire of Norse Mythology. There are many parallels between the characters found within the novel, notably Frankenstein and his Monster. It could be argued that Frankenstein’s Monster is an adaptation of Loki, the Norse Jötunn god of Mischief, and Frankenstein is an adaptation of Thor, the Norse god of Thunder. Through extensive analysis, it is apparent that the climax of the story is very similar to the events leading to the Ragnarok, the Norse Apocalypse, all the way down to symbolic representations.

Firstly, it is important to understand the general context of the Ragnarok. In this case, a specific part of it is observed: when Thor ventures into Niflheim, an icebound wasteland, home to all the evil creatures conspiring towards the end of the world. Symbolically, Frankenstein resembles Thor as he is associated with lightning, adventurousness (through scientific exploits and breaking boundaries). The Monster, represents Loki, as he is quite similar to a Jötunn (Ice Giants) in terms of physique. His actions also resemble Loki as they are meant to cause chaos and lead to the demise of the Hero (Frankenstein).

Upon reaching the arctic wasteland in pursuit of the Monster, Frankenstein’s means of transportation (Sled-Dogs) fails him. This could be interpreted as a representation of Fenrir, Loki’s wolf son, being the first obstacle in his quest. Frankenstein then finds shelter on an expedition ship, thus conquering the sea, which could be interpreted as Jörmungandr (the Sea-Serpent). Unfortunately, as Jörmungandr’s poison kills Thor after the battle, the frostbite and illness claim Frankenstein.

The Monster, now in his solitude, is punished for his crimes in a similar fashion as Loki. The Norse Trickster God was bound by chains for eternity, where poison is dripped onto his head. His wife is there to collect the poison in a bowl before it damages Loki, but when she leaves to empty said bowl, Loki is left to writhe in pain as the poison drips onto him. Similarly, the Monster is left to writhe in agony as the absence of his wife renders him unable to mitigate the emotional pain caused by eternal loneliness.
Sources:

https://ojs.unbc.ca/index.php/joe/article/download/234/307

http://norse-mythology.org/gods-and-creatures/the-aesir-gods-and-goddesses/loki/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fenrir

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C3%B6rmungandr

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loki

Frankenstein’s Monster: An Archetypal Lover

To understand the content of this post, one must first understand the context and basic concepts of Jungian Archetypal Psychology. Carl Jung was a famous psychologist who believed that the human psyche follows archetypal patterns, and that personality could be predicted according to said archetypes. While the number of archetypes increases as we delve deeper into more specific psychological characteristics, for the sake of simplicity, this analysis will focus on the 12 major archetypes.

These 12 archetypes are divided into three sets of 4; The Ego, the Soul, and the Self. This gives a general understanding of where the interests of each archetype lie. It is important to note that one person may have an amalgam of different archetypal characteristics, however there is always one dominant one. It is also important to understand that the given archetype of a person may change after a life-changing event has occurred, as is the case for Frankenstein’s Monster.

From what is described in the beginning of the novel, where the Monster is introduced and has a chance to re-tell its experiences, readers can clearly see that, initially, it is not evil. Given the desires that drive the Monster, it is clear that he belongs to the Lover archetype. The Lover aims a sense of intimacy and belonging with others, and does so through passion, admiration, and selflessness. This is clearly visible when the Monster assists the family of peasants in their daily struggles. Completely altruistic in being, the creature merely wishes to be of assistance. However, the Monster’s personality directly clashes with his physical appearance. Though he has perfect white teeth and flowing black hair, his eyes remain pale and dead, which is a permanent barrier to his sense of inclusion.

After facing colossal rejection from the object of his admiration, the Monster’s personality consumes itself in chaos. His passion degenerates to rage, self-loathing, and vengeance. All the positive aspects of the Lover are warped into their negative counterparts. This follows the typical symbolism of the “Son eating the Father”, as is represented in Oedipus, as well as numerous myths throughout history. This leads to both the demise of the Father (Frankenstein) as well as Son (the Monster). The creature becomes essentially the antithesis of his own being.

Sources:

http://www.soulcraft.co/essays/the_12_common_archetypes.html

Religion in Frankenstein

While many understand Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” as a novel of dismay, there is obviously a religious presence in the background due to the attachment of John Milton’s “Paradise Lost” written in 1667. Milton merged Paganism, classical Greek mentions, and Christianity into the poem.

Moving on, the counter religious manner of Shelley seems to be present. It appears that Shelley is not merely disregarding religion and leaving it out, but instead reasoning against it. While distinctive characters in the story can be associated to biblical symbols, Frankenstein takes place in a world that is absent of religion. Despite this after the story, Frankenstein dies a morally sound man.

 

Welcome to the Frankenblog!

After signing a contract with SLC (Studio for Late Cinema), we are proud to give you the Frankenblog. This blog will be all about Shelley’s Frankenstein novel and provide the faithful fans of the novel with high-quality and diverse material.

 

Our team of experienced, creative, and motivated authors will guide you into the world of Frankenstein while visiting the themes of horror and gothic.

 

We aim to satisfy and meet your desire of more Frankenstein in your life through multiple weekly postings that will terrify even the strongest of souls.

 

To find out more about our passionate and skilled authors, follow this link.