Implications of Human Nature on Shelley’s Frankenstein

Mary Shelley lived during a period of political transformation and at a time when she also witnessed some of the most powerful monarchies of Europe. Those monarchies fought each other and sent soldiers to war. While the war was happening on the streets of Paris, philosophers Thomas Hobbes and John Locke described the nature of humankind. All the atrocities of war inspired them to define our nature. According to their ideologies, humans are born selfish and have an intuitive ability and capacity of being evil. They also believed, alongside Mary Shelley’s mother, that the evil side of mankind was the result of socialization.

Does Mary Shelley agree to this? Not exactly.

Through her novel, Shelley offers a chance to develop and explore these controversial claims about human nature. Even though her mother, Mary Wollstonecraft, believed in those claims, Mary Shelley argues that the evils of humankind are not innate traits. In fact, as Victor Frankenstein’s creature was raised by society in the novel, the evil and the desire of revenge are explained and described by Shelley as being learned, and not innate and intuitive habits.

“I am malicious because I am miserable. Am I not shunned and hated by all mankind?” (Page 104) – The Creature.

Late in the novel, the creature explains to his creator that all the kind and good gestures of his were returned with beatings, gunshots, and rejection of the people he tried to be kind with. He also explains that nobody likes him, that they reject and hate him. The creature then states that all the physical and mental wounds that covers his body and mind are important factors that led to his malice and rage.

With that, Mary Shelley seems to argue that the humans do not have innate traits of revenge and evil. She also argues for a society in which all humans, and even Frankenstein’s creation, have basic rights and are treated equally. That is a society that she would have wanted in her time, a society that was not even close to reach that point and she used Frankenstein to explain it.

 

Source:

https://my.vanderbilt.edu/robot/2015/09/the-implications-of-shellys-frankenstein-on-human-nature-and-government-2/

Picture credit: ww.iaacblog.com

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Foolish Mortals Beware… It’s the House of Frankenstein

Foolish mortals beware…

The summer is coming up and you may be looking for trips and activities to spend the lovely hot days of the summer season.

If you are fans of haunted houses and horror attractions, I suggest you visit the House of Frankenstein in Toronto. Yes, going to Toronto for a haunted house may sound crazy but it is worth the trip as you can also visit different attractions and haunted houses on the same street as the House of Frankenstein.

Your love for Frankenstein will be duplicated as you will encounter the famous creation as well as many “monsters” inside of this terrifying house. Be prepared to face and see the abominations that will make you scream!

Be warned guys… this is not for the weak of heart!

Click here to have more information about the House of Frankenstein.

Are you considering visiting this house this summer? Let us know in the comments!

Picture’s credit: House of Frankenstein, http://www.houseofrankenstein.ca

The Monster’s Creation: A Different Presentation

As we all know, the 1931 Frankenstein movie is an horror and Science Fiction classic. It is also being considered as one of the best movie of all time, genres for genres.

The creation of the monster and the “It’s alive! It’s alive!” line are pure classics that will still be instilled in pop culture for a long time. The line itself was ranked as the 49th greatest movie quote in american cinema history.


Here is a movie clip of the creation of the monster:

After looking at this scene, which presentation of the creation you prefer? Is the passage of the novel more powerful than this classic scene? Let us know in the comments!

Video credit: Movieclips.

SparkNotes’ Summary Video

Hello guys! Today I give you the best summary video on Mary Shelley’s novel that I have been able to find on the Internet.

The SparkNotes team has done an impressing work producing this summary video. The video covers the important parts of the novel while offering a quick synopsis, analysis, and discussions about the major themes and characters of the novel.

I hope you guys enjoy the video and may it help you understand the novel even more!

Credit: SparkNotes, channel: VideoSparkNotes

Frankenstein’s Video Games?

As we all passionately know, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is an important novel in American literature. It has influenced many authors, singers, and artists and it is still an influence on our popular culture today. Many movies have been made from it with a count of approximately 50 films.

Not only movies have been made from the novel, but there are video games too. Yes, you read it right, there is some video games based on Frankenstein.

Here is a list of five of those video games:

Dr. Franken: The Adventures of Dr. Franken

Dr. Franken is a single-player video game originally launched on the Game Boy in 1992. It was also released in 1993 on the Super NES. It was developed by Elite Systems and published by Kemco and DTMC.

The game is about Franky, a Frankenstein’s monster that is on a quest to collect the sprinkled body parts of her girlfriend. The game also consists of seven floors where Franky could find various items and parts of her lovely girlfriend. To resurrect his girlfriend Bitsy, keys and special items are necessary to access new areas and to find all the missing parts of Bitsy.

A sequel to the original game was released on the Game Boy in 1997 and was called Dr. Franken II. In this game, Franky must escape the castle in which he finds himself trapped to search for pieces and gold tablet.

Frankenstein by CRL

Frankenstein by CRL is an interactive fiction game released in 1987 by CRL for the Commodore 64, the Amstrad CPC, and the ZX Spectrum computers.

In this game, the player incarnates Dr. Frankenstein who must find and destroy his unleashed monster. On the other hand, the monster must remain free and learn and understand the reason of its creation.

This game was declared an intelligent, gigantic text adventure with a few magnificent illustrations by Sinclair User.

Frankenstein: The Monster Returns

Frankenstein: The Monster Returns is a single-player Nintendo video game published in 1990 by Bandai. The game was released exclusively in North America.

The game takes place after the Frankenstein story. The creature returns from the dead and lead, by the way of magic, a supernatural army. With its magic, the monster has been able to control mythical entities such as Death and Medusa. In this game, the player incarnates a swordsman that is determined to stop the unleashed monster and its army to rescue Emily, a beautiful maiden that was kidnaped by the monster, a slay the unstoppable thing for good.

Frankenstein: Through the Eyes of the Monster

Frankenstein: Through the Eyes of the Monster is an adventure game that stars Tim Curry as Dr. Frankenstein. The game was developed my Amazing Media and Tachyon Studios and was published by Interplay on PC, Mac, and Sega Saturn in a span of three years between 1995 and 1997.

The player is controlling a newly created monster and tries to resurrect Gabrielle, a disappeared child that was killed in an explosion caused by Dr. Frankenstein. The monster that the player incarnates is the late Philip Werren that is brought back to life by Victor Frankenstein and Gabrielle is Werren’s daughter. There are two possible endings to the game, which give different choices to the player that will branch the game into one ending or the other.

The game received an average of about two stars.

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is a single-player video games that was launched in 1994 for multiple platforms such as the Super NES, the Sega CD, and the Sega Genesis. The game is based on the 1994 film of Frankenstein and was developed by Bits Studio and published by Sony Imagesoft.

In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein video game, the player controls Frankenstein’s monster as it walks through the streets of Ingolstadt, Bavaria. The game takes place in 1793. The player, controlling the creature, seeks revenge against its creator Victor for rejecting him.

The game received a 5.8 out of 10 score from Electronic Gaming Monthly. The magazine called the game a challenging game that includes awkward fighting actions.

 

Now that you know more about those Frankenstein video games, are you willing to try them out? Will you take the fight as the monster or play as the doctor to stop his own creation? Let us know in the comments!

Sources : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Video_games_based_on_Frankenstein

Frankenstein’s Creature: A Little Introduction

An introductory analysis of Frankenstein’s creature.

Frankenstein’s monster, sometimes called Frankenstein, is the creation of Victor Frankenstein himself. The monster was created through an ambiguous and audacious fashion that consisted of alchemy and chemistry. The result of the creation is not what Victor Frankenstein was looking for, which led the creature to become vengeful and dangerous.

In Mary Shelley’s original novel Frankenstein, the beast is never given an actual name even though the monster refers to himself to Victor as “Adam of your labors.” Victor, its creator, calls the monster “creature”, “thing”, “devil”, “ogre”, and “the demon”. It has become more common by the fans to refer to the creature as “Frankenstein,” though it never happens in the book that the monster is named this way. Through multiple movie adaptations of the novel, the monster became best known as “Frankenstein” and the namelessness that it has in the novel is no longer respected in most of them.

Frankenstein’s monster is described as an 8-foot-tall creature that is hideous, horrible, and ugly. It has a yellow pale skin, glowing eyes, hair that flows perfectly, black and dark lips, and beautiful and perfect white teeth. The best-known and most popular image of Victor Frankenstein’s monster is the famous portrayal of Boris Karloff in the 1931 movie adaptation. His portrayal consisted of an undead-like figure, like a zombie, with bolts on each side of his neck that serves as electrodes. The creature wears a dark suit, and heavy dark boots which cause him to walk in a strange manner, manner that is famously associated to it.

The creature has been portrayed more than 67 times in different movie and series adaptations and will be portrayed once again in an upcoming Frankenstein movie by Universal Studios.

The thing is originally a sensitive and emotional creature but it changes quickly. Right at the beginning, the monster is rejected by everyone it encounters and is especially rejected by its own creator due to its ugliness. The thing then seeks to find love and to be accepted, a quest that rapidly turns to failure. When the creature realizes that nobody loves and wants him, he starts to avenge himself through violence on its creator.

Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_films_featuring_Frankenstein%27s_monster

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Monsters_(2017_film_series)

http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/frankenstein/characters.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frankenstein%27s_monster

Welcome to the Frankenblog!

After signing a contract with SLC (Studio for Late Cinema), we are proud to give you the Frankenblog. This blog will be all about Shelley’s Frankenstein novel and provide the faithful fans of the novel with high-quality and diverse material.

 

Our team of experienced, creative, and motivated authors will guide you into the world of Frankenstein while visiting the themes of horror and gothic.

 

We aim to satisfy and meet your desire of more Frankenstein in your life through multiple weekly postings that will terrify even the strongest of souls.

 

To find out more about our passionate and skilled authors, follow this link.