Rant on De Lacey Post

The De Lacey Post. Explaining how De Lacey was able to interact with the Creature without being judgment by his looks.

[Continuation]

A lesson can be learned from this. What if we were all able to walk in the shoes of a blind man for a couple days and meet new people? Even people we absolutely loath. The power of words and bonding without sight can reveal something new in every conversation. By loosing our vision we actually see more then before. This is because our senses obscure our judgment on everything. We are quick to judge when we smell something bad or “feel” hostile presence. In reality we can’t know about any of those unless we encounter them and experience their true essence.

In reality, no one’s perfect. People are weak and unsightly. We grow jealous and try to kick each other down all too easily. Strangely enough, the greater the man, the more he suffers in life. Maybe De Lacey is better than all of us, not because he’s blind but because he knows what it’s like to suffer and loose everything.

Is De Lacey Nice To the Creature Just Because He’s Blind?

De Lacey originated from France, he lives in a cottage with his son and daughter. He’s a kind aged being. P.144 “descended from a good family in France” , he’s the only person we read who treats the monster kindly. But is this only because he’s blind?

His vision isn’t clouded by prejudice of the creature’s ugliness. He doesn’t see the outside of the creature only, his true self. Compared to every other character, he encounters with. Even animals are seen keeping their distance from him. As an example, when he saves the girl from drowning he is “rewarded” with a bullet shot at him.

p.175 “But that cannot be; the human senses are insurmountable barriers to our union.” This is saying that the Creature can never be accepted for the sole reason of his looks. Are people so shallow as to instantly reject and judge him straight away without even considering his story? The creature never asked to be created.

 

 

Frakenblog Quiz: How well do you know Frankenstein? Part II

Quiz.png

In response to all the positive comments on the first quiz, I have made another one since many of our readers have asked for more. Enjoy!

1.    How does Victor Frankenstein’s mother die?

  • She is sentenced to death
  • The monster chokes her
  • She is shot
  • She dies of a disease
  1. How does the monster learn to speak?
  • His creator instructs him by reading to him and daily lectures
  • His creator enhances his human like capacities with the help of alchemy
  • By learning from Walton
  • By listening to Felix teach Safie his language
  1. In Paradise Lost, to which characters does the monster relate to?
  • Adam and Satan
  • Adam and Eve
  • The son of God
  • Raphael
  1. Which of the these is NOT one of the famous alchemists of which Victor studies in his youth?
  • Hydrargyrum
  • Alain De Lille
  • Lucretius
  • Chymes

5.    Which of these books is NOT of those read by the monster?

  • The inferno
  • Paradise lost
  • The Odyssey
  • Eumenides

6.     What does Walton do after Victor dies?

  • He doesn’t care, he laughs and continues with his work
  • He leaves Geneva and with his painful memories
  • He moves to the south where he changes careers and tries to forget his past life
  • He swears vengeance upon him and plots to slay the monster

7.    After successfully saving the girl, what event takes place right after?

  • The girl, frightened by his looks, shrieks for help and kicks the monster
  • He is awarded and given a home and promised safety
  • He is shot
  • He is damned and hunted away

8.    In chapter 6, Justine Moritz confesses the murder of William, what is her consequence

  • She is banned from the town for five years, she must come back a new person
  • She is legally condemned to execution
  • She is condemned to life imprisonment
  • She is lynched before her trial, her body hanging from a tree

9.    What is the monster’s motive when he kills Victor’s brother?

  • He decided to kill everyone he is associated with and then end his own life
  • He was cursed into doing so with dark alchemy
  • This is his reaction when Victor attempts to create something else
  • He is sick of all people relate to Victor in any way

10.  What happens on Victor and Elizabeth’s wedding night?

  • The monster assaults Elizabeth and slaughters her
  • The monster assaults Victor and slaughters him
  • The monster is intimidated and does not take his revenge
  • Victor knew the monster would come so devises a plan to capture and kill him

 

answers
Enter a caption

 

Answers: 1:a  2:d   3:a   4:c   5:a   6:b   7:c   8:b   9:d   10:a

 

(Questions and answers inspired from Sparknotes.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Epic Quotes from Frankenstein, What Could they Mean??

No human being could have passed a happier childhood than myself. My parents were possessed by the very spirit of kindness and indulgence. We felt that they were not the tyrants to rule our lot according to their caprice, but the agents and creators of all the many delights which we enjoyed. When I mingled with other families, I distinctly discerned how peculiarly fortunate my lot was, and gratitude assisted the development of filial love.”

-Frankenstein, Chapter 2

Could there be a different meaning behind Frankenstein’s childhood? One that contrasts directly with his creation? Victor’s childhood life was distinguished by his parents who cared and loved for him. In a sense, the monster’s “childhood” if we may, antitheses with his own.


One man’s life or death were but a small price to pay for the acquirement of the knowledge which I sought, for the dominion I should acquire and transmit over the elemental foes of our race.”

-Walton, Letter 4

Here Robert is writing to his sister about how important his goals are. Could he possibly be saying that it’s ok of if a man dies in the name of science as long as he fulfills his principles of scientific achievements? Walton is starting to go some-what mad. Is there possibly a foreshadowing effect?

 


When night came again I found, with pleasure, that the fire gave light as well as heat and that the discovery of this element was useful to me in my food, for I found some of the offals that the travellers had left had been roasted, and tasted much more savoury than the berries I gathered from the trees. I tried, therefore, to dress my food in the same manner, placing it on the live embers. I found that the berries were spoiled by this operation, and the nuts and roots much improved.”

Just like his creator, is he attempting to comprehend the existence of acquiring scientific results by repeated, varied attempts which are continued until success?

-The Monster, Chapter 11


Cursed, cursed creator! Why did I live? Why, in that instant, did I not extinguish the spark of existence which you had so wantonly bestowed? I know not; despair had not yet taken possession of me; my feelings were those of rage and revenge. I could with pleasure have destroyed the cottage and its inhabitants and have glutted myself with their shrieks and misery.”

The Monster, Chapter 16

The phrase “The spark of existence which you had so wantonly bestowed” ressembles a lot like a disapproval of people having babies, mainly taking into account that the word “wanton” is used when defining excessive sexual activity, which in the past meant that the family tended to have an”immoderate” amount babies.

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Frakenblog Quiz: How well do you know Frankenstein?

Quiz

  1. How do Elizabeth Lavenza and Victor Frankenstein meet in the original (1818) version of the text?

 

a) They are brother and sister.

b)They are best friends.

c)They are cousins.

d)They used to date.

 

  1. What happens when Victor takes Henry to the university?

 

a) Victor fantasies about Elizabeth.

b)Victor sees the monster he has created.

c)They fight each other

d)Talk of the sciences worsens Victor’s illness.

 

  1. What does Victor’s father hope to do by going to Belrive?

 

a) Help Victor and Elizabeth fall in love

b)Get away from religious oppression

c)Improve Victor’s moods

d) Become familiar with new culture

 

  1. What surprises Victor on the glacier?

 

a) The appearance of the monster

b)A ghost

c)His culpability about Justine’s death

d)The resurfacing of his illness

 

  1. What text does the monster find the most influential?

 

a)The Bible

b)Milton’s Paradise Lost

c)Dante Alighieri’s Divine Comedy

 

6.What does the monster beg Victor to do?

a) Put an end to his existence

b)Ask God for his mercy

c)Overlook all that he has revealed
d)Build him a friend

 

answers

Answers:

  1. c)
  2. d)
  3. c)
  4. a)
  5. b)
  6. d)

Inspired by http://www.sparknotes.com

Religion in Frankenstein

While many understand Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” as a novel of dismay, there is obviously a religious presence in the background due to the attachment of John Milton’s “Paradise Lost” written in 1667. Milton merged Paganism, classical Greek mentions, and Christianity into the poem.

Moving on, the counter religious manner of Shelley seems to be present. It appears that Shelley is not merely disregarding religion and leaving it out, but instead reasoning against it. While distinctive characters in the story can be associated to biblical symbols, Frankenstein takes place in a world that is absent of religion. Despite this after the story, Frankenstein dies a morally sound man.

 

How Alchemy Altered Frankenstein

Alchemy

Frankenstein is a novel written by the English author Mary Shelley in 1818 tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a youthful scientist who creates an incongruous but wise creature in an eccentric scientific experimentation. Even though alchemy and the alchemists, are hardly referred to in the novel, they are essential to the persistence of the plot. It is the alchemists and their notions, predominantly those of Paracelsus and the thought of the elixir of life, that drive Victor Frankenstein to pursue the idea of life through science, eventually leading Victor to the creation of the beast in Frankenstein.

Paracelsus was a Swiss alchemist and physician who perceived and used alchemic treatment above all other ideas of alchemy to help people. Paracelsus. This treatment would be able to lengthen the life of man by curing them, and consequently allow them to live an improved life. It was believed that the elixir of life, a goal of many alchemists, was the ultimate cordial that would allow a person to live forever. Considering this, an individual can asses something similar to Victor’s idea in Frankenstein. Victor himself pursues the legendary elixir in the novel. Wealth meant nothing to him compared to what glory would follow the discovery. He wanted to remove illness from human existence completely.

A contemporary fallacy is that alchemy is the act of transfiguring objects such as wood and metal into gold and silver for material gain. In Frankenstein, the natural attitude that is mentioned views alchemists as those who wished to uncover the mystery of life and the creation of lifeless objects in addition to those who pursued to restore the human soul to excellence. Through viewing alchemy in such way, Victor desires to use the alchemy he learns from his educators to eliminate the state of death. This objective is not for wealth but for the benefit of the people.

Alchamy